spacer
The Vacuum Issue 2 spacer Issue 2
Some Technical Terms
by Stephen Hackett
spacer
Concerning the term 'Redneck' The origins of this term are Scottish and refer to supporters of the National Covenant and The Solemn League and Covenant, or "Covenanters", largely Lowland Presbyterians, many of whom would flee Scotland for Ulster (Northern Ireland) during persecutions by the British Crown. The Covenanters of 1638 and 1641 signed the documents that stated that Scotland desired the Presbyterian form of church government and would not accept the Church of England as its official state church.
spacer
Concerning the term "hillbilly" Varying sources for the word have been advanced. Its first known use in American print comes from The New York Journal, April 23.1900. A "Hill-Billie" was described as "a free and untrammelled white citizen of Alabama, who lives in the hills, has no means to speak of, dresses as he can, talks as he pleases, drinks whiskey when he gets it, and fires off his revolver as the fancy takes him."
spacer
Concerning "Cowboy Dancing" The long hours in the saddle and strenuous work produced dancers of questionable finesse. He was not of a temperament to master intricate dance steps. Rather he would join a dance with a wild whoop and a goat cry. Joseph McCoy, the first great cattle baron, wrote in 1874 that the cowboy "usually enters the dance with a peculiar zest, his eyes lit up with excitement, liquor and lust. He stomps in without stopping to divest himself of his sombrero, spurs or pistols."
spacer
Concerning Dolly Dolly Parton the Queen of Country spoke of her pride at being Scotch Irish just before a sellout gig in Belfast. In an interview with the Belfast Telegraph she said, " there is no reason why I haven't played Belfast in the past. But with my Scotch Irish ancestry its ridiculous that I haven't been here before. Obviously my roots have been a massive influence on my music" Dolly then said that she would love to return to Northern Ireland being very proud of her heritage she would love to find out more. The Ulster Scots Agency who presented Dolly with a Ulster Scots translated version of her hit "Jolene" said she would be very welcome ".
spacer
spacer
Concerning Foster and Allen A journalist once pointed out to Foster & Allen's mentor, Donie Cassidy, that the duo's vocals were far too loud in the mix. "That's deliberate policy," responded Donie, " We did a survey and found that 15% of Foster & Allen's audiences are deaf."
spacer
Concerning the term Gringo Often used in Latin America to refer to people from the United States, "gringo" also has a Scottish connection. The term originates from the Mexican War (1846-1848), when American Soldiers would sing Robert Burns's "Green Grow the Rashes, O!", or the very popular song "Green Grows the Laurel" (or lilacs) while serving in Mexico, thus inspiring the locals to refer to the Yankees as "gringos", or "green-grows". The song "Green Grows the Laurel" refers to several periods in Scottish and Ulster-Scottish history; Jacobites might "change the green laurel for the "bonnets so blue" of the exiled Stewart monarchs of Scotland during the Jacobite Rebellions of the late 1600's - early 1700's. Scottish Lowlanders and Ulster Presbyterians would change the green laurel of James II in 1690 for the "Orange and Blue" of William of Orange, and later on, many of these Ulstermen would immigrate to America, and thus "change the green laurel for the red, white and blue."
spacer
Some Technical Terms
spacer
Sources:
www.scotshistoryonline.co.uk
spacer
spacer
home | information | issues | artists & writers | columns | reviews
spacer